Team kicking off extreme ecology research in Tierra del Fuego

In collaboration with Professor Katie O’Meara, an architect, Professor Zaitchik, an Earth Scientist, and researcher Claire Moriarty, we are examining the use of drones to map keystone species in extreme environments such as cushion plants in Patagonia or shrubs in deserts. This is just a pilot experiment (haha, get it), and we need a graduate student for 2020 to dig in and ground-truth the metrics we will derive from imagery. The focus will be structure and architecture in natural systems.

Bromus ecotypic contrast experiment up and running in Israel for winter growing season 2020

York Science Fellow Dr. Jacob Lucero and international collaborator Dr Merav Seifan are launching into 2020 with an ambitious experiment in Israel and California. The purpose is to explore the relative importance of provenance of a highly invasive species of bromus in the deserts of California by comparing performance and key interactions in its home range, Israel, and in its introduced range, California. This is a new direction from previous work published in NeoBiota entitled ‘The dark side of facilitation: native shrubs facilitate exotic annuals more strongly than native annuals’ that demonstrated a very significant effect of bromus on local plant community dynamics.

Setup in Israel was a positive adventure!

steps to update a manuscript that was hung up in peer review forever then rejected (or just neglected for a long time)

Sometimes, peer review (and procrastination) help. Other times, the delays generate more net work. I was discussing this workflow with a colleague regarding a paper that was submitted two-years ago, rejected, then we both ran out of steam. This was the gold-standard workflow we proposed (versus reformat and submit to another journal immediately).

Workflow

  1. Hit web of science and check for new papers on topic.
  2. Download the pdfs.
  3. Read them.
  4. Think about what to cite or add.
  5. Add citations and rebuild biblio. 
  6. Update writing to mention new citations especially if they are really relevant (intro and discussion).
  7. Take whatever pearls of wisdom you can from rejection in first place and revise ideas, plots, or stats.
  8. Format for new journal.
  9. Check requirements for that journal.
  10. Search the table of contents for the journal and check your lit cited to ensure you cite a few papers from that journal – if not, assess whether that the right journal for this contribution.
  11. Download pdfs from new journal, read, cite, and interpret.
  12. Then, look up referees and emails.
  13. Write cover letter.
  14. Set up account for that new and different annoying journal system – register and wait.
  15. Fight with system to submit and complete all the little boxes/fields.

Better knitting to pdf

title: ""
author: you
header-includes:
\renewcommand{\contentsname}{}
output:
pdf_document:
fig_caption: no
toc: TRUE
toc_depth: 3
# \renewcommand{\contentsname}{} insert preferred word inside {} instead of Contents or leave blank as desired
# toc: TRUE indexes headers but ensure you set depth to match you preferred font size/header style i.e. ### 3
view raw rmd_YAML_PDF.txt hosted with ❤ by GitHub

Experiential Education Symposium at York University

I had a great time last week representing the Lortie lab and discussing work from my research practicum with president and vice chancellor of York university Rhonda Lenton. Aside from gaining wonderful feedback from her, which will definitely assist me in my future endeavours, I was thrilled to present the importance and impact of biology research with her as well as the many other influential attendees. I am excited and eager to experience the opportunities that lie ahead.

Commencement of Native vs. Exotic Competition

After a 2 month growing and censusing period, followed by a harvesting, drying, and biomass census I have concluded my 200 pot competition series.
During this period, I had obtained a photometer to measure light levels and did two light census for both the overall pot as well as below canopy. I am hoping that these light measures will provide quantifiable insight on the effect light has on growth. I hypothesize that plants receiving ambient light will yield greater mean biomass per species, while those in shade conditions (to mimic shrub presence) will have a greater mean height due to leggy growth.
I wanted to quantify the growth of my plants through several metrics, and therefore chose to obtain both height and leaf measurements for each species from each pot. In order to acquire these measurements, I implemented a new censusing technique for my second and final census. In this census I counted the number of individuals of each separate species there were per pot. Following this, I took the tallest individual of each species, and recorded its height along with the number of leaves. This way, following the harvest and mechanical oven drying period I would be able to compare the biomass of the plant with its height and leaf count. This would allow me to evaluate plant growth using two separate dimensions; plant height along and number of leaves vs. plant biomass.

After using a mechanical drying oven set to 62 degrees Fahrenheit for 48 hours, I used a precision scale to obtain the biomass of each plant.

The experiment planning, seed counting, pot filling, plant censusing, harvesting, and biomass analysis processing were extensive processes. I am extraordinarily grateful to Dr. Christopher Lortie, Dr. Jacob Lucero, Masters graduate Jenna Braun, research practicum student Anuja, and Economics and Finance student Denis Karasik for their time, efforts, and immense assistance with running this experiment.

Statistical analyses for all of the results are still in work, and I am eager to see the conclusion my experiment comes to.

Hours of biomass censusing in one photo

All the plants before the harvest

A flower from the beautiful Phacelia tanacetifolia
Plantago insularis also grew flowers

Biology for environmental management posters

Biology for environmental management class was an examination of the capacity for biological and ecological levers from primary research to be used for management and social good.

 

BIOL4265 posters

https://figshare.com/s/8f911be3597eafccd7b0

https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.7469519.v1

https://figshare.com/articles/Biodiversity_and_Species_Lost/7411688

https://figshare.com/articles/_Wave_Goodbye_to_Coral_Reefs/7413128

https://figshare.com/articles/BIOL4265_-Deforestation_and_Climate_Change/7381115

https://figshare.com/articles/In_Hot_Water_A_Global_Loss_of_Biodiversity/7409621

https://figshare.com/articles/Green_Spaces_Poster/7469519/1

 

Quick notes on plant harvesting

Ok, our competition trials never look that good.

useful paper: Designs for greenhouse studies of interactions between plants

Protocols

  1. Aboveground harvest: clip from soil surface.
  2. Belowground harvest: need to harvest entire plant at once by removing plants and roots from pot experiments (for instance) and gently washing to remove all soil but keeping roots and shoots intact.  Then, snip aboveground growth from below.
  3. Depending on level of replication and lowest possible independent sample unit, harvest one individual, one species, or all individuals of one species per pot into independent paper bags.
  4. Place in ovens at 68F for at least 2 days.
  5. Leave all plants in paper bags in oven until the moment you are ready to weigh.
  6. Remove from paper bags to weigh for small plants. Typically, I weigh to 3-4 decimal grams for small desert annual plants.
  7. Return plants to bag, do not return to oven, store in a paper box for a few weeks or until all data entered and checked.