Data logger discoveries

The first micronet study is now complete. Cuyama Valley was instrumented using Onset micro-stations with temperature and soil moisture sensors for two full seasons. I made some very important discoveries in wrapping it up this autumn.

 

  1. Cables are heavy.
  2. Animals are much more active in the summer.
  3. Cables are yummy to animals.
  4. Deploying loggers with sensors is a magnet for new burrows.
  5. Heat cooks batteries.

Here is hoping the data recovered are just as fascinating. Honestly, I am tempted to do a wire-addition experiment. Observation suggests that there is a very real magnet effect of wires.

 

Posted in fun

Ecoblender hosting a workshop: An Introduction to R and Generalized Linear Models

Full details are provided here.
https://afilazzola.github.io//YorkU.GLM.2017-04-28/

General Information

The purpose of this workshop is to provide tools for a new/novice analyst to more effectively and efficiently analyse their data in R. This hands-on workshop will introduce the basic concepts of R and use of generalized linear models in R to describe patterns. Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own problems.

Who: The course is aimed at R beginners and novice to intermediate analysts. You do not need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Where: 88 Pond Road, York University. Room 2114 DB (TEL). Google maps

Requirements: Participants should bring a laptop with a Mac, Linux, or Windows operating system (not a tablet, Chromebook, etc.) with administrative privileges. If you want to work along during tutorial, you must have R studio installed on your own computer. However, you are still welcome to attend because all examples will be presented via a projector in the classroom. Coffees and cookies provided for free.

 

How to use colour in manuscripts

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I thought this was a very helpful guide on using colour in figures. There are a few rules, but one comment from the whole document stands out. “If colour serves a purpose, but something other than colour would do the job better, avoid using it”.

http://www.perceptualedge.com/articles/visual_business_intelligence/rules_for_using_color.pdf

Here are the simple rules:

1. If you want different objects of the same color in a table or graph to look
the same, make sure that the background—the color that surrounds
them—is consistent.

2. If you want objects in a table or graph to be easily seen, use a background
color that contrasts sufficiently with the object.

3. Use color only when needed to serve a particular communication goal.

4. Use different colors only when they correspond to differences of meaning
in the data.

5.  Use soft, natural colors to display most information and bright and/or dark
colors to highlight information that requires greater attention.

6.  When using color to encode a sequential range of quantitative values,
stick with a single hue (or a small set of closely related hues) and vary
intensity from pale colors for low values to increasingly darker and brighter
colors for high values.

7.  Non-data components of tables and graphs should be displayed just
visibly enough to perform their role, but no more so, for excessive salience
could cause them to distract attention from the data.

8.  To guarantee that most people who are colorblind can distinguish groups
of data that are color coded, avoid using a combination of red and green in
the same display.

9. Avoid using visual effects in graphs.

 temp