Waiting for the rain

Rainfall updates

The growing season of 2015-2016 has come and gone with disappointing results from the supposed El Niño year. The 2016-2017 season is approaching and a few had feared that it would just continue the current pattern of drought. I was especially fearful having battling drought four years in a row in my study of plant interactions. It would be nice to have a chance with at least “average” precipitation amounts. Half way through the rain season and this year looks promising. Areas of California have been seeing some pretty significant precipitation including some potential floods. While this is great news in terms of drought relief for coastal cities and the Sierra Nevada snow pack, I wonder what the consequences will be for the deserts? In particular, the Mojave always seems to be in the unluckiest of rain shadows, missing most of the precipitation that the rest of the state experiences. I took a snap shot of the rainfall and average temperatures since seeding at the end of October. Here are the results:

Interpretation

The right combination of rain, temperature, and timing are absolutely crucial in desert ecosystems in regards to how the plant composition will respond. In an older paper by Beatley (1974) is a description of how these three variables determine plant composition. From this and my own experience, the absolute minimum rain to see any annual vegetation on the ground is 2.5 cm. However, these plants usually die within a month if there is no subsequent rain. I have seen this occur in multiple years where Halloween rain is not followed by any other precipitation until mid-January. The result? Many dead plants, and a new representation for plant communities. The Mojave has seen enough rain to begin germination and this rain has all occurred within the last 3 weeks. This, plus continued cold temperatures, should encourage the persistence of annuals for at least another month. If at least one other major rain storm passes through in that time I would expect to see these plants make it to flowering. On the more westerly side of the state, my sites have been seeing fairly consistent rain. This is great news for my Panoche Hills site that likely has passed its precipitation threshold that guarantees emerged plants to flowering.

Fingers crossed as always!

Progress Report – Fall 2016

Several weeks ago I completed my first progress report for my MSc program. This involved a giving a short presentation (slides above) followed by a question/discussion period. My thesis focuses on pollination facilitation – non-competitive pollinator sharing between plant species that improves the reproductive success of at least one of the participants. I will be investigating these interactions in the Mojave Desert, a biodiversity hotspot supporting 659 species of bees and 1680 annual plants.

Why spatial? The study of ecology is normally separated into hierarchies, however, we know that these different levels are integrated and interact despite studying them in isolation. All interactions take place in space, and so explicitly including spatial dimensions to a study can be a way of connecting these levels, leading to a deeper understanding of the observed interactions.

It can be a little intimidating to stand in front of your committee and tell them your ideas, but they are there to support you. I received some great feedback which I am using retool my experimental design in preparation of the upcoming field season. Advice: Be careful about your clipart choices! I used a picture of queen honeybee (they don’t pollinate!!) in an interaction diagram explaining pollination facilitation. This isn’t as bad as the infamous biology textbook “Bees of the World” showing a pollinating fly on the cover, but it was noticed right away.

Precipitation mediates the mechanism of facilitation in a Californian Desert

ESA 101 at Fort Lauderdale is coming up! I will be presenting on recent findings from an experiment we conducted over two years. I am extremely excited for both the presentation and the results! Here is the slide deck, statistical analyses and program outline.

https://afilazzola.github.io/water.consumer/

Background/Question/Methods
The stress gradient hypothesis original purposed the frequency of plant interactions along countervailing gradients of abiotic stress and consumer pressure. However, research to date has studied these two stressors in isolation rather than together, thereby potentially neglecting the interaction of these factors on plant composition. In the arid central valley of California, we artificially manipulated a soil moisture gradient and erected animal exclosures to examine the interactions between dominant shrubs and the subordinate annual community. We conducted this experiment in an extreme drought year (2014) and a year of above-average rainfall (2016).

Results/Conclusions

Shrubs positive affected the abundance and biomass of the annual community at all levels of soil moisture and consumer pressure. In the drought year, shrub facilitation and water addition produced similar positive effect sizes on plant communities; however, the shrub facilitation effect was significantly greater in watered plots. During the year with higher rainfall, there was no observed water or exclosure effect, but shrubs still significantly increased biomass of the subordinate plants. Shrubs and positive interactions maintain productivity of annual plant communities at environmental extremes despite reductions in droughts stress or consumer pressure and these positive effects are even more pronounced with water addition. The relationship between consumer pressure and abiotic stress on plant interactions is non-linear particularly since shrubs can facilitate understorey plants through a series of different mechanisms.

Plant field season 2016

As the plant field season comes to a close, the lizard field season kicks off. Here are some picture highlights.

Phacelia tanacetifolia glistening in the sun at Carrizo plain – cred to ARL

Eschscholzia californica in Cuyama Valley

Eschscholzia californica in Cuyama Valley

Rocking my favourite phytometer species: Salvia columbariae

Rocking my favourite phytometer species: Salvia columbariae

IMG_20160315_162829353

Herbivory? Check

IMG_20160326_142750091

The hemi-parasitic Castilleja exserta, surrounded by Lasthenia

 

San Joaquin Desert #phenology update

An excellent post from near (and at one) of the sites within the San Joaquin Desert gradient that Alex and others study was written by the director of the Tejon Ranch. The Cuyama Valley where I have been leading some field research on the capacity for foundation plant species to buffer global change is about in the middle of the extended gradient we work on from Panoche Hills Ecological Reserve to the Mojave.

The phenology was incredibly variable from site to site within the Cuyama Valley. We did not pick up an elevation or aspect signal to explain the variation from emergent and established plants to individuals nearing senescence. Apparently, prolonged drought and very sporadic rains even for desert ecosystems have introduced considerable micro-environmental variation.

IMG_0036 IMG_0035

IMG_0059 IMG_0058

Whilst in other spots, within just a few miles, same species, similar micro-environmental strata, we had these glorious showings!

IMG_0090 X3ahw IMG_0089

Over at Carrizo National Monument, there were similar sets of patterns from full flower to early senescence.

IMG_0098

The shifted phenology of California deserts 2016 – utter madness

Hitting the field again tomorrow. Likely at least two weeks early from ‘regular’ desert seasons. A bit of rain and high temperatures has apparently lead to massive ‘all-chips-in’ for the native annuals that have been holding on for 5+ years of drought.

The very likely consequence is a mismatch with the pollinators within the region that are NOT up and busy yet.

Leap year indeed.

IMG_0017

Photos by Brent Johnson on Feb 27th, 2016.

 

Collapse of facilitation in the Atacama Desert?

Fig. 1 big survey Fig. 2 big survey

 

In this study we surveyed 3 deserts along the extension of the Atacama Desert: Atiquipa (15.7 S), Romeral (29.5 S) and Fray Jorge (30.5 S) over 3 years. Within each desert we sampled 5 sites, each separated at lest 2 km from each other. This allowed us to sample extensively the effects of dominant plants (shrubs) on plant communities within these deserts.

 

Results, as can be seen in the figures above, indicate that at extreme aridity conditions such as in Romeral and especially Fray Jorge (the most arid sites), dominant plants have a negative effect on both richness and abundance of arid plant communities. Surprisingly at Atiquipa, the strongest positive effects occurred during the driest year of the 3 years surveyed.

Filazzola 2016 updates

Its 2016 whoa!

I enjoyed a solid break at the end of December but am looking forward to getting back into the grind. There are some crucial things I would like to tackle before my progress reports:

  1. RDM paper – I have finalized the statistics and need to get back to the writing. I am reading the literature to get a better idea on how to properly structure an animal distributions paper. Something I’m not accustom to.
  2. Field work – Gradient – I’m very excited for this experiment. It is been raining in California so  am hoping for some heavy germination. The rain patterns have somewhat followed my gradient pattern as well with my more coastal sites seeing higher precipitation. About time the rain came
  3. Field work – Exclosures – I am reconducting my exclosure experiment and building 60 new plots. Recreating the experiment I did two years ago in the worse drought, now in heavy rains will be the perfect contrast. It shall be interesting to see which way the trends flip
  4. Other stuff? – There is a lot but two primary ones I need to get done is finalize the Ecography paper before the due date and come up with a workflow for the facilitation ecologists who want to write a synthesis paper.

Overall, please with the way my winter is shaping up. Cali is a lot colder than it has been in the past, but lots of rain makes for a happy ecologist! I am also going to try to shoot a video short during my time in the field. Stay tuned for all the gory details!temp