CSEE 2017 Highlights

This year the ecoblender lab attended CSEE 2017. The conference was great and covered four days of talks, workshops, and networking events. I attended a free workshop that taught some basics in mapping spatial data and different packages to use in R. There was also a wide range of talks that mostly seemed interdisciplinary. This included discussions of uncertainty in ecology, estimate the value of natural resources, and developing models of habitat selection. Here are some of the highlights I took away from the conference:

Modelling:

There was discussion over the usage and power of mechanistic vs. phenomenological models. This is a topic discussed often in ecology (see of that discourse here), but can be defined here as:

mechanistic: includes a process (physical, biological, chemical, etc) that can be predicted and described.

phenomenological: Is a correlative model that describes trends in associated data but not the mechanism linking them.

The discussion mostly described the relationship between phenomenological and Mechanistic models as not binary and rather a gradient of different models that describe varying amounts of a particular system. However, it did touch upon models such as GARP and MaxEnt that are often used for habitat selection or SDM but neglect the mechanism that is driving species occurrence. Two techniques I would like to learn more about are Line Search MCMC and HMSC which is a newly developed method for conducting joint species distribution models.

Camera traps:

There was also a morning session that described benefits and tools for using camera traps. These sessions are always great as they give a chance to see some wildlife without disturbance. Topics focus around deer over abundance harming caribou populations, how wildlife bridges do not increase predation through the Prey-Trap Hypothesis and techniques for using wildlife cameras or drones. One talk that was particularly interested used call back messages when triggered to see how animals respond to noises such as human’s talking or a mating call.

One of the more useful things I believe to have taken out of the session is how to estimate animal abundance and movement when the animals in your camera traps are unmarked. One modelling technique using Bayesian modelling and was found to be equivalent to genetic surveys of animal fur for estimating animal abundance. This is in contrast to the more frequent spatial capture-recapture (SCR) methods that either mark individuals or supplement camera trap data with other surveys. I also discovered there the eMammal project at the Smithsonian that is an Open Access project for the management and storage of camera trap data.

Ecology and climate change:

Climate change as always is a big topic at these conferences. There was a good meta-analysis out of the Vellend lab that show artificial warming of plant communities does not result in significant species loss. However, there was evidence that changes in precipitation does significant impact plant communities. The results are very preliminary, but I look forward to seeing more about it in the future. I also liked a talk that is now a paper in Nature that models networks in the context of climate change. The punchline of the results being that species composition in communities is dependent on dispersal, and high dispersal rates can maintain network structure although members of the community may change.

I presented results from our upcoming paper modelling positive interactions in desert ecosystems:

Overall I learned a lot from the CSEE 2017 conference and thought it was a health balance of size and events. Victoria was also a great city and made hosting the conference very easy. Next year it will in the GTA and I plan on connecting with the organization committee to potentially host an R workshop at the beginning of the conference. Until then!