Rules-of-thumb for collaboration

Rules-of-thumb for reuse of data and plots
1. If you use unpublished data from someone else, even if they are done with it, invite them to be a co-author.
2. If you use a published dataset, at the minimum contact authors, and depending on the purpose of the reuse, consider inviting them to become a co-author. Check licensing.
3. If you use plots initiated by another but in a significantly different way/for a novel purpose, invite them to be co-author (within a reasonable timeframe).
4. If you reuse the experimental plots for the exact same purpose, offer the person that set it up ‘right of first refusal’ as first author (within a fair period of time such as 1-2 years, see next rule).
5. If adding the same data to an experiment, first authorship can shift to more recent researchers that do significant work because the purpose shifts from short to long-term ecology.  Prof Turkington (my PhD mentor) used this model for his Kluane plots.  He surveyed for many years and always invited primary researchers to be co-authors but not first.  They often declined after a few years.
6. Set a reasonable authorship embargo to give researchers that have graduated/changed focus of profession a generous chance to be first authors on papers.  This can vary from 8 months to a year or more depending on how critical it is to share the research publicly.  Development pressures, climate change, and extinctions wait for no one sadly.
Rules-of-thumb for collaborative writing
1. Write first draft.
2. Share this draft with all potential first authors so that they can see what they would be joining.
3. Offer co-authorship to everyone that appropriately contributed at this juncture and populate the authorship list as firmly as possible.
4. Potential co-authors are invited to refuse authorship but err on the side of generosity with invitations.
5. Do revisions in serial not parallel.  The story and flow gets unduly challenging for everyone when track changes are layered.